Richmond Barracks

Timeline of the building

1810

Work is completed on Richmond Barracks, but it will be four years before it is occupied.

1814

On 21 June, a ball is held at Richmond Barracks to mark the start of it as a working barracks and continues until 6am.

1822

The Oxfordshire Regiment from Richmond Barracks help fight a fire at Hibernian Woolen Mills in nearby Kilmainham.

1832

Cholera takes hold in many parts of Ireland.

1845

The potato crop fails several times all over Ireland, coupled with an inadequate policy response from the British government.

1847

Dublin sees a severe outbreak of cholera and instructions are issued to the soldiers of Richmond Barracks.

1853

The Crimean War begins and regiments of Richmond Barracks prepare to travel to the front line.

1860s

The War Office attempts to close Goldenbridge Cemetery, citing health and safety.

1869

Depression and suicides among soldiers motivates the army into refurbishing the Barracks.

View showing the glass cupola veranda

1899

The second Boer war starts in South Africa and becomes Britain’s biggest conflict since the Crimean war.

Argyll and Sutherland Regiment

1914

Richmond Barracks enlists Irish men, amongst them the poet Francis Ledwidge who joins the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers.

1916

At the end of the Easter Rebellion, around three thousand men and women are brought to Richmond Barracks to be processed.

Detainees

1918

A general election sees the Nationalist party, Sinn Féin, win a landslide victory over the whole of Ireland.

1922

Following the establishment of the Irish Free State, Richmond Barracks is handed over to the Irish National Army.

1926

The former garrison chapel used by soldiers becomes the church of St. Michael of the Angels

1969

Most of the Barracks is demolished to make way for new public housing.

2006

St Michael's Christian Brothers school closes.

2013

The last block of St Michael's estate is demolished.

2016

Richmond Barracks opens as a visitor attraction with tours of the gymnasium, the old school rooms and garden.

The Yarn School quilt

1814

The Royal Cheshire and Lancashire Regiments are the first men to occupy Richmond Barracks.

Richmond Barracks Regiment in Review Order. J.H. Lynch after M.A. Hayes - c.1833

1816

There is great excitement as English balloonist Windham Sadler’s hot air balloon ascends from Richmond Barracks.

1828

Daniel O’Connell, ‘The Liberator’ and advocate for Catholic rights, opens Goldenbridge Cemetery, with the Catholic Association.

1843

The Commander of the Forces issues orders for all men to remain in barracks in Dublin so that they may be called on to deal with food riots and rebel attacks.

1847

The Great Southern and Western Railway line opens in Inchicore.

1851

After six years of famine the population of Ireland has gone from 8.175 million (Census 1841) to 6.55 million (Census 1851) due to emigration, disease and death.

1855

A report released on military living conditions gives an insight into the lives of soldiers' wives.

1864

Recreation rooms are opened in Richmond Barracks, including a library and games room with plays and lectures taking place.

1881

The Land League hold a ‘Great Public Meeting’ in the Phoenix Park, just across the river from Richmond Barracks.

1914

War is declared and troops are sent from Britain to the many barracks in Dublin to prepare them for the Western front.

1916

Support for Irish independence from Britain has been growing.

1917

Having served in Gallipoli, Francis Ledwidge is injured and returns to Dublin on leave.

1919

The first Dáil Éireann (Parliament) sits in Dublin

1925

The Irish army vacate Richmond Barracks and is becomes a residence for families

1929

St Michael's Christian Brothers school opens.

1970

St Michael's estate is built on the site to house families and the aged.

2012

The Health Services Executive opens a Primary Care centre in one section of the old barracks.

2014

The local community attends the launch of the Richmond Barracks renovations as Dublin City Council include it as part of the Decade of Centenaries to commemorate 1916.

2020

Dublin City Council Culture Company are brought on board to run the building