Autumn Schedule:

 

Mondays at the Mess – 1st  October at 11am

 

“The Witness and the Archive: Digital Responses to Ireland’s institutional history”

Mondays at The Mess - A Series of Talks & Lectures

Lecturer: Emilie Pine

 

In this talk, Emilie Pine will consider the ways that digital approaches to archives can tell new stories and act as a belated form of witnessing. The lecture focuses on the University College Dublin project Industrial Memories, which digitally re-reads the 2009 Ryan Report on institutional child abuse in Ireland, using approaches such as text analytics and mobile apps to open up the archive. This document is one of the most important publications in the history of the Irish state. It is also one of the least read. Pine considers how digital approaches might change that.

This project is funded by a major New Horizons grant from the Irish Research Council, 2015-18.

Emilie Pine is Associate Professor of Modern Drama at University College Dublin. She is Editor of the Irish University Review and Director of the Irish Memory Studies Network (www.irishmemorystudies.com). She has recently launched the Goldenbridge mobile app & website resource Echoes from the Past (echoesfromthepast.org) and has published widely in the field of Irish studies and memory studies, including The Politics of Irish Memory: Performing Remembrance in Contemporary Irish Culture (Palgrave, 2011). Her most recent publication, Notes to Self: Personal Essays, is published by Tramp Press.

Approx duration of talks: 1 hr.

Free Frestival of History 2018 Event which includes tea/coffee & scone can be booked through Eventbrite.

The 1918 General Election – Lecture by Cormac Moore

Lecture by Cormac Moore

Dublin City Libraries Historian-in-Residence, Dublin North Central

A look back at one of the most consequential general elections in Irish history, held just after the First World War had ended in December 1918.  The franchise had increased dramatically, giving some women the right to vote for the first time. The talk will explore the spectacular success of Sinn Féin and the implosion of the Irish Parliamentary Party, as well as the unique circumstances in Ulster where Ulster Unionists won the majority of seats.

Q&A with John Dorney, author of The Civil War in Dublin – April 2018

Listen to John Dorney, author of The Civil War in Dublin: The Fight for the Irish Capital 1922-1924, answer questions on how the city became the site of a nine month long guerrilla war, in which over 250 people were killed and 500 wounded in the Dublin area.  While the cycle of executions, atrocities and reprisals was taking place in the city, ordinary citizens tried to get on with their daily lives.

Momento mori : Post-mortem photography and child mortality in early 20th century Dublin

Lecture by Orla Fitzpatrick

Photo Historian

Since its invention in 1839, photography has been used to record and commemorate the dead. Did this happen in Dublin? Examples are rare; however, evidence shows that the city’s photographers provided such a service.
Drawing on mortality statistics, newspaper accounts and detailed case studies this talk will examine post-mortem portraits of Dublin children who died in the early twentieth century.

Gala Days – Executions in Late Medieval Dublin

Lecture by Dr Áine Foley

This talk explores execution in Dublin city and county in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. Public execution was the norm in the medieval period and some executions could draw large crowds. The modern expression Gala Day is derived from the Anglo-Saxon gallows day, confirming that these were public events from a very early period. This talk will discuss where the gallows were located in Dublin, why people were executed, as well as examining the different methods of execution used in the medieval city and county.

The Devout and the Deviant

Lecture by Molly O’Duffy

In 1935 The Criminal Law Amendment Act was passed in the Irish Free State. It dealt with sexual crime and sexual activity.
Molly’s talk will outline the context that led up to the Act, it will examine how women were viewed in the act, and the impact that had on the women of Ireland.

The talk will also discuss the way in which the purity of women became an essential part of the how the new State viewed itself, thereby branding sexually active women as “deviant”. This Act was a crucial episode in the development of relations between men and women in Ireland and was a missed opportunity to address the real problem of increasing sexual assault.

Surgeons, Starlets and Storytellers

Lecture by Maeve Casserly

Historian-in-Residence with Dublin City Council – South East Area

Listen to Maeve Casserly as she retraces the footsteps of the some famous (and not so famous) women of Dublin’s South-East area. Delve into the interesting world of the women who lived and worked in this historically rich area. From Dr. Kathleen Lynn’s home practice in Rathmines to the stained glass studio of An Túr Gloine founded by Sarah Purser in Ringsend – and everything in between!